Parade of delinquency and terror, part 2

Posted on November 17th, 2009 4 great comments. Room for one more!

In part 1 of this explosive exposé on the real Santa Claus Parade in Toronto, I went into detail on some of the hazards and ordeals that you are really subjecting your kids to by bringing them along to the event. You may not even be aware of this because, as an adult, you’ve had a good chunk of time to build up your comprehension and so your defences. It’s like understanding how lightning works; it’s still a nervous giggle of a WHAM! outside but you don’t hightail it under your couch like the cat. You know you’re safe.

Consider this, for example:

santa claus parade, 2009, yonge street, dundas street, university avenue, christmas, seasonal, holiday, parade, crowd, people, children, floats, toronto, city, life

Awww. You see Santa’s Workshop, a few rosy-cheeked, satisfied elves sitting outside with the happy labours of the year past, some cute houses topped with fluffy snow and powdered sugar. Merry Christmas, kids!

From another angle, this is Santa’s Sweatshop, miserly and terribly underdressed children cast outside their warm shelters in the middle of a cold Siberian winter, no doubt for under-producing for the “jolly old elf” (who’s probably enjoying himself a back-alley rub-and-tug somewhere in Bangkok). Merry freakin’ Christmas, kids.

At this point, some parents may say, “But I’ve taught my kids well. They’ll make the right choices.” I’ve no reason to doubt anyone’s parenting skills, but upbringing is no match for military-style indoctrination. Pretty soon your kid’s goose-stepping down University Avenue with the rest of his comrades:

santa claus parade, 2009, yonge street, dundas street, university avenue, christmas, seasonal, holiday, parade, crowd, people, children, floats, toronto, city, life

Still not willing to co-operate? Let’s see how he feels after this:

santa claus parade, 2009, yonge street, dundas street, university avenue, christmas, seasonal, holiday, parade, crowd, people, children, band, floats, toronto, city, life

No? I see; junior likes to play hardball, huh?

santa claus parade, 2009, yonge street, dundas street, university avenue, christmas, seasonal, holiday, parade, crowd, people, marching band, children, floats, toronto, city, life

That’s right. If they don’t get him one way, it’ll be another. Do you really want your kid playing a tuba? What kind of a horrible parent are you to even consider that question?

And if you think that maybe some discipline might actually be good for your kid, take a moment to consider this: these groups are all about coercion, cohesion, group-think; discipline here is mostly founded on fear and mistrust. They don’t think twice about throwing a few members under the car to preserve the organization:

santa claus parade, 2009, yonge street, dundas street, university avenue, christmas, seasonal, holiday, parade, crowd, marching band, flag bearers, people, children, floats, toronto, city, life

If, at this point, you still think that attending the parade with your children is acceptable, consider how the police will protect your kids once they’re “in the wild”:

santa claus parade, 2009, yonge street, dundas street, university avenue, christmas, seasonal, holiday, parade, crowd, people, police, children, floats, toronto, city, life

Exactly, not at all. The cops stood there the entire time, not a care on their faces. Smiles, some of them. Instead of doing their jobs and clubbing / shooting / arresting people, they just stood around watching the procession like it was the eleven o’clock news. I think some of them were even drinking some sort of hot chocolate beverage. Drinking. On the job.

I did mention some of these displays were insidious, didn’t I? See if you can spot the hazard in the following scene:

santa claus parade, 2009, yonge street, dundas street, university avenue, christmas, seasonal, holiday, parade, crowd, cheerleaders, queen's university, people, children, floats, toronto, city, life

Yes, university-aged girls are dangerous, but I’m talking about something more immediate. Imagine, the moment the pyramid goes up, the sweaty old men come out of the woodwork clutching their malodourous camera phones, flashing yellow smiles, and sporting all sorts of unpleasant stains on their sweatpants.

I’m sorry to have to get so graphic, but it’s important that parents everywhere be aware of what really goes down every year. This is simply no place for kids.

And finally, what about jolly old Saint Nick? What’s his ultimate role in all of this?

santa claus parade, 2009, yonge street, dundas street, university avenue, christmas, seasonal, holiday, parade, crowd, people, children, floats, toronto, city, life

I don’t think any secret has ever been made of Santa Claus’ hyper-critical judgment of humanity: rewarding lists of people who fall within his insane definition of “nice”, monitoring those on the “naughty” lists for whom he reserves his own personal retribution. And heaven help you if you don’t accept one of his magnanimous “gifts” come Christmas.

Once again, I can’t stress enough how terribly inappropriate this event is for children. The numerous examples given in these two posts are, I think, sufficient to convey the imminent dangers you’d be placing your children under. Keep them away for all the right reasons.

Plus, they start to get irritatingly loud and underfoot after a couple of hours.

4 Comments on “ Parade of delinquency and terror, part 2 ”

  • High-Tech
    November 20th, 2009 12:59 pm

    Nice Pictures


    Read more from High-Tech at: http://high-tech-360.blogspot.com/
  • Patrick
    November 20th, 2009 9:23 pm

    Thanks, High-Tech.


  • None of your busines
    March 15th, 2011 6:30 pm

    You are sick person.


    Read more from None of your busines at:
  • Patrick
    March 22nd, 2011 5:31 am

    Good to know, None of your business.


What's on your mind?